STUDENT 
        ACTIVITY: A RECIPE FOR SAUTAUTHIG THEN AND NOW

Sautauhig: 

Note to parents     Recipe

A favorite dish of the Native Americans during colonial times was Sautauthig (pronounced saw'-taw-teeg), a simple pudding made with dried, crushed blueberries, dried, cracked corn (or samp), and water. Later, the settlers added milk, butter and sugar when they were available. The Pilgrims loved Sautauthig and many historians believe that it was part of the first Thanksgiving feast.

OBJECTIVE

Reinforce the concept of cultures adapting to available resources of the land.

Math Link Reinforce measuring, units, equivalents, fractions (students can "build up" recipe for class tasting).
Language Arts Link: Compare the English in a 17th century recipe with a recipe written today.
Health/ Nutrition Link: Have students identify where on the Food Pyramid each ingredient belongs.
Home Link: Recipe can be prepared at home by one or more parents and brought in for the tasting.

School Foodservice Link: Ask your school foodservice staff to assist with this activity. They may be able to supply ingredients and equipment.

MATERIALS
bullet Download/ duplicate Student Activity Sheet: SAUTAUTHIG...Then & Now and Letter to Parents

bullet For Recipe Demo:
bullet Hot Plate
bullet Measuring cups
bullet Large Pot
bullet Ingredients (See Recipe)
bullet Mixing spoon
bullet Small paper cups/plastic spoons

INSTRUCTIONS

bullet
Use duplicated student activity sheets or copy onto the blackboard or poster board the directions for Sautauthig in old English (as described in a letter by John Winthrop Jr. to the Royal Society in London in 1662) and the updated version of Sautauthig--Blueberry Cornmeal Mush. Ask for volunteers to read both versions.
bullet Ask students to compare the language of the old recipe with the modern one.
bullet Discuss all the different ways of preserving food using blueberries as an example.
bullet Have students participate in (or demonstrate) preparation of Blueberry Cornmeal Mush--enough for each student to taste (or ask a parent to bring in prepared dish for tasting).

Parents:

Your child has been learning about one of North America's few native food crops -- BLUEBERRIES. They were around long before the Pilgrims arrived. The Native Americans loved blueberries and used them in many ways--as food, as medicine, even as a dye. The early colonists quickly learned how to use blueberries and created many wonderful blueberry dishes. Today, North Americans still love blueberries--it is one of our favorite fruits.

One of our lessons discusses a recipe for Sautauthig, a corn and blueberry pudding that the Pilgrims learned to prepare from the Wampanoag Indians. Some historians believe it was served at the first Thanksgiving.

We have attached an updated recipe of this colonial favorite so that you can prepare it at home with your child. We hope you enjoy it.

Sincerely,

The Blueberry Council Recipe: SAUTAUTHIG...THEN

A favorite dish of the Native Americans during colonial times was Sautauthig (pronounced sawí-taw-teeg), a simple pudding made with dried, crushed blueberries, dried, cracked corn(or samp), and water. Later, the settlers added milk, butter and sugar when they were available. The Pilgrims loved Sautauthig and many historians believe that it was part of the first Thanksgiving feast. In a letter to friends back in England, one colonist describes how Sauthauthig was prepared:

"...this is to be boyled or stued with a gentle fire, till it be tender, of a fitt consistence, as of Rice so boyled, into which Milke, or butter be put either with sugar or without it, it is a food very pleasant...but it must be observed that it be very well boyled, the longer the better, some will let it be stuing the whole day: after it is Cold it groweth thicker, and is commonly Eaten by mixing a good Quantity of Milke amongst it."

from the Plimoth Plantationís web site

SAUTAUTHIG... NOW

Here's a recipe that gives us an idea of what Sautauthig tasted like. We call it Cornmeal Blueberry Mush but you can give it any name you want.

CORNMEAL BLUEBERRY MUSH

1 1/2 cups water
1 1/2 cups milk
3/4 cup cornmeal or quick cooking grits
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons maple syrup or honey
2 cups fresh, frozen or canned blueberries or 1/2 cup dried blueberries (see note)

  1. In a 2-quart saucepan heat water and milk until bubbles form around edge of pan.
  2. Stirring constantly, slowly add cornmeal or grits and salt until well combined.
  3. Reduce heat to low. Cover and simmer, until thickened, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Stir in maple syrup or honey until well combined.
  5. Gently stir in blueberries.

Yield: about 6 regular servings or 12 tasting-sized servings (about 4 3/4 cups)

NOTE: Today, we don't have to pick and dry blueberries in the summer to enjoy them year round. We can always find them in our local supermarket --either fresh, frozen or canned, sometimes even dried. If you are using frozen blueberries in this recipe, defrost them between 2 layers of paper towels to absorb excess liquid. If you are using canned blueberries, drain well. Fresh or frozen blueberries can be dried on a cookie sheet in a 250 degrees F oven for about 1-1/2 hours.

 

Copyright 2002 - U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council